Saturday, 22 May 2010

Flutters in Kent.

A few of the flutters seen during our visit to Northwood Hill on Friday.
Cinnabar Moth (Tyria jacobaeae).
One of the RSPB staff kindly pointed me to a location where Green Hairstreaks (Callophrys rubi) had been seen fighting. With such strong direct sunlight this individual was defending its territory and regularly perched amoungst the greenery that made it even harder to focus so here are the best of a few images.
Its antenna and legs are striped black and white.
Always rests with its wings closed. The upperwing is in fact brown.
Probably a recently arrived (migrant) Red Admiral (Vanessa atalanta). Just a pity it wouldn't open its wings.

Finally a Peacock (Inachis io) soaking up the sunshine.     FAB. 

14 comments:

  1. Your photos as usual are exquisite. The btterflies are amazing. Look at the colors of the cinnebar and the green hairstreak--could anything be lovelier?

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  2. Nice to see the Green Hairstreaks Frank. I've not seen one of those for a few years now!

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  3. Thanks Frank for sharing these nice pictures of butterflies with us. I miss them so much...

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  4. Love the bugs! Oh my gosh, we have Red Admirals too!

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  5. Kay. Thanks. Hopefully over the next month or so more flutters will make themselves available for me to share with you.

    Jenny. Just as well I was told where to look...when perched they can be well camouflaged.

    Chris. It's that time of year when the birds play hard to find in all the foliage so have to look for other colourful species.

    Steve B. So we have something else in common then!

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  6. Beautiful photos as usual :). We have very few butterflies here at the moment, and I've yet to see a Peacock (Dad has seen one). I suppose that will quickly change when the Buddleia comes out, though :D.

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  7. Gaina. Things will hot up over the next month or so and the nectar blooms in your garden will certainly help.

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  8. Very nice to view your moths and butterflies, for they are so different from our own. Nice work Frank, have a good rest of the weekend~

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  9. Amazing! Such beauty to behold.

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  10. Mary. It's always a pleasure to share.

    Mona. Glad you liked them.

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  11. Great to see the Cinnabar moth, they're so distinctive. Nice pics of the Green Hairstreak Frank, I enjoyed my first ever sighting of a Green Hairstreak this weekend in Leeds, you managed better pics than I did. In my case I think it was the excitement that made it hard to focus. Lovely stuff. Linda

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  12. kirstallcreatures. I'll admit to some post processing on the Green flutters Linda and they are far from easy to get into focus when perched out in the sunlight. At least you got some good 'damsel' shots. FAB.

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  13. The Cinabar is a great thing to see, Frank. Glad you found a Green Hairstreak too.

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  14. Emma. At first I thought it was a Burnett and had to check the guide when I pulled the image up. Looked for Green Hairstreak locally today but no luck. Do finally have some Blues to post soon.

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I hope you enjoyed your visit and I always appreciate your comments and feedback.

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