Thursday, 7 January 2010

Watching Red Deer (Part 1)

While I work on the pics from todays local walk I thought I would share some shots taken in late December when I revisited a small group of Red Deer stags in Richmond park enjoying each others company after the rut. Whilst the light was poor; a cold misty day with rain in the air; the 'watcher' was able to get reasonably close to these beautiful beasts without any unecessary disturbance.

European red deer antlers are distinctive in being rather straight and rugose, with the fourth and fifth tines forming a "crown" or "cup" in larger males. Any tines in excess of the fourth and fifth tine will grow radially from the "cup". West European Red Deer antlers feature bez (second) tines that are either absent or smaller than the brow tine. A stag can sometimes be found with antlers without any tines, and is then known as a 'switch' and a stag that doesn't grow antlers is called a 'hummel'.

It is not easy to accurately age a stag but with a total of 8 points (tines) to his antlers this guy was certainly not the oldest in the pack but at least in his second or third year.


For more images please check out my linked site FABirding.   FAB.

13 comments:

  1. I have checked out both sites, and all image entries of these Red Deer are delightfully majestic and beautiful. The weather afforded you a perfect softness to these mighty forms~

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  2. They are beautiful, and a great asset to this country. Well done Frank.

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  3. Great shots of a lovely beast.

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  4. You got some really great photos on this trip Frank. Beautifully atmospheric.

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  5. Hi Frank,
    You were right to share them with us. They are stunning pictures... I love the atmosphere and the nice portrait you did. Gosh I would like to get some around!!! Well done mate!

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  6. Great shots Frank - and the weather would be just like it is in Scotland in summer!! LOL!!

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  7. Great that you went back and re-found the stags Frank and some lovely shots of them too; especially in such poor light. The snow (in your previous post) has been around long enough now and I, for one, wish it would go.

    Keep warm ;)

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  8. Mary. Yes they are majestic animals and I felt privileged to get reasonably close to them.

    Bob B. They sure are. Thanks.

    Thanks TonyC. Ah..you do remember what snow looks like! No more gloating as you soak up the sunshine.

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  9. Hi JRandSue, Roy, JPT, Jenny and Chris. Thanks for all your comments.

    Hi Tricia. It was good to go back and must repeat during 2010. You are right, the conditions are certainly not too friendly but we may have a long wait!

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  10. Fabulous shots Frank. Love them all.

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  11. Thanks Angie. It was fun getting them.

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I hope you enjoyed your visit and I always appreciate your comments and feedback.

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