Tuesday, 24 August 2010

Doe and Fawn.

During a late morning stroll on Monday I came across a Roe Doe quietly grazing in a field with her young fawn. Fortunately the wind was in my favour (a very strong breeze from my right) and my outline was partially hidden by the field boundary vegetation so moving slowly to gain a better view I waited to see if I could obtain some clearer images. 
Every now and then the Doe would stop feeding, stand up and sniff the breeze, occasionally looking in the direction of the watcher but not picking up any noticeable scent she continued her feeding activity. 
Her young fawn copied the mother and also peered towards the watcher but was also unfazed by any slight movement the watcher made to get a clearer view. 

Roe Deer (Capreolus capreolus), also known as the Western Roe Deer or chevreuil, is an Eurasian species of deer and are native to Britain, having been present since before the Mesolithic period. Forest clearance and over-hunting led to roe deer becoming extinct in England by 1800 but following several reintroductions during Victorian times their subsequent, natural spread aided by an increase in woodland and forest planting in the 20th century has meant that roe deer have become widespread and very abundant today. They are small and elegant; easily identified by their white rump patch with short tush in females; a black nose, white chin plus their bounding gait when alarmed.
The rut takes place in late July or early August. The females are monoestrous and after delayed implantation usually give birth the following June, after a ten-month gestation period, typically to two spotted fawns of opposite sexes.

All images were captured with the 70-300 zoom and have been cropped as these creatures were approximately 80 - 100 yards away.   FAB.

18 comments:

  1. Congratulations. It's a very beautiful animal and it's very difficult to capture it so well. Grat photos:)

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  2. Wow what a beautiful encounter Frank... They are quite frequent also in France and I remember last year that we could see many just outside the house of my parents. That was a real pleasure to see them every morning grazing in the garden ;-)
    You got superb shots of them and I guess that was a memorable moment...

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  3. There is something intrinsically peaceful about deer grazing in a field, even if they are over-abundant pests, as they often are in and around our US cities.

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  4. Hi Frank. These are wonderful shots of the Roe Deer. My big challenge is getting close enough to our "Whitetail" deer for some excellent photos like yours. Thank you for posting your camera equipment. I'm always interested in what other folks are using for cameras and lenses. I'm seriously contemplating purchasing the new Canon Rebel T2i. I love my EOS 40D, but it's quite a bit bigger and heavier than a Rebel, which sometimes presents a challenge for me, when I have big lens on it.

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  5. Incredibly beautiful, Frank....I just do love this graceful animals; you captured the essence of this delicate animals so well!!!!!
    MAGIC!!!!!!

    have a geat evening!
    ciao ciao elvira

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  6. Nice one Frank. I still have a Roe Deer in a Miaze field on my patch. Not sure if its stuck there or if it just likes it there :-)

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  7. Hi Joanna. Thanks. It's great to get these opportunities once in a while.

    Hi Chris. A very timid creature so I was delighted to get these shots.

    Hi Chris P. A serene scene. My parents can attest to the damage they can cause when tramping through their garden!

    Hi Mona. I have no experience of the heavier Cannon bodies but I'm sure you'll get on well with the Rebel.

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  8. Hi Elvira. Thanks. I was fortunate as these creatures made it fairly easy for me providing I didn't allow them to 'see' me.

    Hi Warren. I guess your Roe is comfortable with its surroundings. They can be very bold and no longer always hide away in their traditional wooded domains.

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  9. Cracking shots Frank.
    Good bit of field craft too.

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  10. Hi Frank Hope all is well with you!!
    Nice photos of the Roe Deer..there is something magical about the encounter with them !!
    The young one is so cute with those big ears.. he looks like he could fly!! : }

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  11. Great photos Frank, capturing a fawn esp is pretty exciting in my book.

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  12. Such a peaceful scene Frank. Wonderful they did not spook and run away.
    I would have been rooted to the spot.......

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  13. Hi Keith. Lessons in fieldcraft and stalking learnt a long time ago and fortunately never forgotten.

    Hi grammie g. I'm holding up.
    Definitely a magical wildlife moment.

    Hi Jann E. Yes, the heartbeat went up a notch or two when I realised the possibilities.

    Hi Cheryl. The peaceful scene seemed like ages but in fact it was not long before mum jumped the fence and sped away! The younster just froze and waited until I departed before moving on.

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  14. Frank, Fantastic. Absolutely beautiful. Carol

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  15. Hi Carol. Thanks, glad you liked these pics.

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  16. Lovely. The deer here a a major nuicance but you can't help but find them beautiful as photo subjects. Nice work.

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  17. Hi Robin. They can be a nuisance over heare as well but still a delight to photograph.

    Hi Roy. Cheers.

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