Saturday, 12 December 2009

Looking Down.

Another day at home today potting up the last few spring flowering bulbs and a bit of pruning. Attempts to snap the garden visitors was thwarted by their unwillingness to perch out in the open long enough when visiting the topped up feeders so I thought I would share some unpublished 'reflective' images from my recent local patch exploration.

Looking down can be just as rewarding as looking up and it's less strain on the neck!



Above and below taken at a small pond.

Finally two sorts of fungi and I'll be delighted if someone wants to tell me exactly what they are.

Fungi in the wooded area.

This one was growing in the open (arable) field.

20 comments:

  1. Love the reflections. Not may people shoot fungi, that's too bad. Perhaps they will be inspired by these?

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  2. Loveley reflections Frank. Natures mirror. I like the simplicity of the post in the water.
    Mushroom ID, even with my book I still struggle, (like gulls and waders lol) Hopefully someone can identify them for you.

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  3. Hi Frank,
    It is nice to see a bit more of your patch and the reflection shots are really nice!!! As you know I never think of taking pictures of the landscape and I should sometime! Your area seems to be very nice for birding!

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  4. Great post Frank. Love the reflective shots.

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  5. Good Kingfisher perch in photo 4. One day ?

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  6. Hi Frank Really great reflection shots from around your patch,looks like a lovely place to stroll around. Right the Fungi, as near as I can Get the first one looks like THE DECEIVER a variable fungus found among leaf litter in decidous and coniferous woodland. The second appears to be BUTTER CAP/GREASY TOUGH SHANK. Again found in the same type of Habitat. Both are common and widespread. I only have a small section on fungi in one of my books and these look the most likely.Also a good reference site is WILD ABOUT BRITAIN here you can find submitted Photo's on almost any nature subject.

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  7. Nice post - love the reflection shots - sorry can't help with the fungi id.

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  8. ...I love all your reflections, and you're right about it being easier on the neck! The only think I know about fungi is it's cool to look at, but don't touch and definitely don't eat--because I know nothing about it! Lovely photos...

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  9. Really beautiful reflections there. I especially like the 'above and below' photos.

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  10. Love the reflection Images, great stuff Frank.
    John.

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  11. Amazing reflections Frank. Love them!!

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  12. I'm getting caught up on my blog reading - so glad I did that beginning with your reflective images - they are not just captivating, but some almost disorienting (is this pic upside down?) - and of course your bird documenting is always appreciated - a trip across the pond has to come soon for me, I hope.

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  13. I enjoyed all these reflection shots! More proof there is so much beauty in the world!

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  14. Steve B. There are quite a few blogs over here that shoot fungi. I just need to start identifying what I see!

    Keith. Reflections are mesmorising. I'm sure someone will come up trumps with the ID's.

    Chris. We will have to see as the seasons unfold what the local area produces.

    Angie. Thanks.

    Warren A Kingfisher..now that would be special.

    Monty. Thanks for helping with the fungi ID. I'll check that site out very soon. Cheers.

    Sharon. Thank you.

    Kelly. Definitely look but don't touch..just in case.

    mick. Thanks.

    JR and Sue. Cheers John.

    Joan. Just glad you found time to drop in and look.

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  15. Chris P. The shot is definitely the right way up but I agree how disorientating it can seem....that's the beauty of nature.
    I hope you make it over here some time...would be great to meet up for a chat and a stroll. FAB.

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  16. Hi Shelley. On days when the birds don't play ball it's great to capture the natural beauty to share with everyone.

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  17. Frank, it looks like you're really having a lovely time since the work days ended. I envy all your free time! Those fungi are very interesting looking, but I have no clue as to their identity.

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  18. Heather. I needn't hve worried about filling my free time so far and I'm definitely enjoying the 'no work' ethic!

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  19. This post was "linked within" from the one you just posted today and I clicked on it. So glad I did! I've always been fascinated with the beauty of reflected images (maybe because I live on a river bank). You have captured some beautiful ones.
    -Kay

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  20. Hi Kay. Lower light levels in winter with the trees in 'skeleton' mode often provide good opportunities for capturing reflections. Glad you liked these.

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