Friday, 21 June 2013

Singing in the wind.


I don't know why any bird would pick such an unstable perch to announce its presence on such a blustery day but this male Reed Bunting (Emberiza schoeniclus) continued to sing with brief silent interludes for over 10 minutes whilst rocking back and forth.
To listen to its song with the sounds of Wren and Reed Warbler in the background just as I did during a visit to RSPB Lakenheath, exactly a week ago, please click on the recording below.


Its conservation status was classified as RED following a rapid decline of more than 50% from the mid 1970's to the mid 1980's but with evidence of some recovery in numbers it was moved to the AMBER list in 2009. Because of its association with wetland breeding habitats (reedbed and riverine scrub), it has been informally known in the past as the 'water sparrow'. 
Interesting fact: Over 50% of Reed Bunting chicks are not fathered by the pair male but are the result of an adulterous liaison, the highest recorded rate of any bird.  

Wishing everyone a wonderful wildlife watching weekend. FAB.

Linking to Feathers on Friday and I'D-Rather-B-Birdin'.

23 comments:

  1. Wonderful photos, Frank, and thanks so much for joining me for Feathers on Friday!

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    1. prairiebirder. Thank you Charlotte. I'll try to link up every week if I have something decent to post.

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  2. oh, he's cute. i like his song, too.

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    1. Theresa. I'm always surprised how far that 'thin' sound carries especially on a windy day.

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  3. It may be the way my PC handles Java but I can't get the bird song to play.

    Come rain, shine or wind many song birds insist on sitting on the highest thin branch they can find.

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    1. John. I really don't know why it won't play for you but I have e-mailed the direct link.

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  4. What a little tough guy - love how you've caught him pouring forth his presence. Great photo.

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    1. Thanks Ann. He sure had a roller coaster ride!

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  5. Hi Frank This is a lovely little bird and it was nice to hear him singing. I didn't know they were the most promiscuous, I thought it might be the Dunnock. Thanks for comment today on my post, just in case it disappears!! Margaret

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    1. Hi Margaret. Yes, the Dunnock is also promiscuous but its sex life is far more complicated. I did a post way back in 2009 in an effort to explain .. http://fabearlybirder.blogspot.co.uk/2009/02/dunnock.html

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  6. Hi Frank
    Many thanks for the wishes,and good to see the images of the Reed Bunting they are a cracking little bird.
    Take care.

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  7. Thanks Lois. But not quite as colourful as the Lily on your pond.

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  8. He is a beauty!! Boom & Gary of the Vermilon River, Canada.

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  9. It is a beautiful bird! I hope its population picks up!

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  10. Lovely shots. He's picked a very interesting place for his singing.

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  11. What a fantastic series Frank...seriously, I've not spotted one of these, and it truly is a beautiful warbler!!

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  12. ...sorry...bunting. No wonder I haven't seen one, I don't know a bunting from a warbler. [insert wink]

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  13. it is a pleasure to listen to it. And see the bird too. Thanks for sharing.

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