Thursday, 8 September 2011

Circuit of Farlington Marshes.

Last Friday I drove to the south coast and took a leisurely stroll around Farlington Marshes. As is typical of this coastal location most of the species were far too distant for the lens but it was great to be out on a breezy but fairly cloudless day. Due to construction work alongside the access road I had a longer than expected walk in order to get onto the reserve.
On my arrival it was still low tide but my first sightings from scanning the main pool produced long awaited views Curlew Sandpiper (2) and a single Little Stint. (All new sightings for 2011). Other inhabitants of the pool included Common Redshank, Lapwing, Grey Plover with many porting their black waistcoats, a large flock of Black-tailed Godwits, Ruff (4), Dunlin, plus Mallard, Gadwall, Moorhen, Coot and Shelduck.

 Black-tailed Godwit.

By scoping the open mudflats I added Little Egret, Grey Heron, Curlew plus the usual gatherings of Black-headed, Herring and Common Gulls. Leaving the seawall behind I headed down alongside the stream where I watched the aerial acrobatics of large numbers of Sand Martins and Swallows busily feeding up prior to their southward migration. The bushes produced views of Cetti's Warbler, Blackcap, Common Whitethroat, Goldfinch, Greenfinch, Wren, Blackbird and Reed Bunting. Scanning eastwards I located a Common Buzzard perched on a fencepost before heading back onto the southern edge of the seawall path.

A Clouded Yellow butterfly briefly perched on the grassy path before disappearing and only allowing me a single shot of its distinctive closed wings. At The Deeps I added Canada Geese and a very lonely Brent Goose plus small flocks of Oystercatchers calling as they flew way out into the harbour to gather on  the distant shingle islands. There were a few Great Crested Grebes on the sea but I failed to locate an Osprey that had been seen during recent days. I did however manage to find a dozen or so Yellow Wagtails flitting around the hooves of the cattle on the inner 

Northern Lapwing.

After a complete clockwise circuit I ended back at the main pool which was full of the mixed flocks of waders logged earlier in the morning but now included a single Whimbrel, a few Knot plus 20 Greenshank. This peaceful sight was soon disturbed by a male Peregrine Falcon who managed to grab a Dunlin and flew into a nearby field to consume its prey. When the waders eventually resettled I also spotted a male Sparrowhawk sitting very patiently on the rear edge of the pool but its attempt to catch a meal was unsuccessful.
Northern Wheatear before it disappeared into the grass!

This shot of one of the many ringed Black-tailed Godwits to be found at this site was taken in 2009. For more information and images from my previous visits to Farlington Marshes please click this link.   FAB. 

20 comments:

  1. very pretty collages! i like them! and that waterway pic with the grasses on both sides... lovely!!!

    ReplyDelete
  2. What a fun visit with some good catches.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Oh my, lovely series, Frank! I so enjoy seeing the variety birds through your lens.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Lovely photos of the birds Frank. I like how that grass looks along the marsh. Nice scenery. I've never seen any of those birds except for maybe some geese and ducks years ago. So pretty.

    ReplyDelete
  5. I would love to see a lapwing - they look so exotic!

    ReplyDelete
  6. ...love the shots of the Godwit. I saw my first Marbled Godwit this spring in Florida, and what a beauty he was. I've fallen in love with the bird. Your Black-tailed Godwits are just as gorgeous.

    ReplyDelete
  7. The Black-tailed Godwit is fantastic.

    ReplyDelete
  8. Beautiful photos of birds and scenery. We may never get to your side of the globe, but at least we see your beautiful pictures:)

    ReplyDelete
  9. Beautiful as always Frank...everytime I see those lovely Lapwings, I wish I could see one for real!

    ReplyDelete
  10. Great birds from your visit Frank.

    ReplyDelete
  11. Terrific birding! Amazing how many species you were able to locate. I guess the autumn migration is beginning to bring some travelers through.

    ReplyDelete
  12. Sounds like a great day. Eagerly awaiting my first Curlew Sandpiper of the year.

    ReplyDelete
  13. So many water birds, i love it!! :)

    That Northern Lapwing is surely a very handsome dude!! :)

    ReplyDelete
  14. Excellent post Frank. and an impressive number of 'ticks'...[;o)

    ReplyDelete
  15. Your collages are great and love the introduction to birds I have never seen! Great job Frank!

    ReplyDelete
  16. A lovely tour Frank... beautiful images.
    Godwits are always lovely to see.

    ReplyDelete
  17. Excellent visit Frank. You got so many birds. I find that sometime it is also good to go only with the binoculars and enjoy the bird instead of trying to get a picture of them ;-)

    ReplyDelete
  18. Really a nice place for birding!
    Saludos camperos.

    ReplyDelete
  19. What a great day!! I want to join you on a birding trip!! I would add so many birds to my life list, which, by the way, increased to #300 today with the observation of 3 Sabine's Gulls!! I'm pretty excited! Thanks for the beautiful pictures. I'd just be happy to see ONE of the birds pictured above. ~karen

    ReplyDelete
  20. Really like your collages. Really like that Godwit.

    ReplyDelete

I hope you enjoyed your visit and I always appreciate your comments and feedback.

If 'Word Verification' shows up then it's a Google glitch. Just ignore it and click 'publish' as usual.

LinkWithin

Related Posts with Thumbnails